Current research

  • A Mixed Methods Evaluation of a Culturally Specifically Latina Victim Service Program: The LAVIDA Partnership

    Funder: Office on Violence Against Women

    Principal Investigator: Debra Patterson

    Debra Patterson

    Co-Investigator: Stella Resko

    Stella Resko

     The project seeks to understand: a) what distinguishes culturally specific services from mainstream services and the intended outcomes for enhancing Latina survivors’ wellbeing b) Latina survivors’ self-defined goals and needs, and c) the extent to which the culturally specific services meet those needs and help survivors achieve their goals. This project is being accomplished through a community-participatory exploratory sequential mixed methods evaluation of a culturally specific Latina victim service program.

  • Behavioral Health Workforce Interdisciplinary Education and Training Grant

    Funder: Health Resources and Services Administration

    Co-Principal Investigator:
    Suzanne Brown

    Sue Brown

    Co-Principal Investigator:
    Umeika Stephens (College of Nursing)

    Umeika Stephens

    With this grant from the U.S. Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA), Dr. Brown and Dr. Stephens are working to educate and train graduate social work and nursing students, their nursing preceptors, social work field education supervisors and faculty advisors, and community partners in integrated mental health care delivery. Areas of focus include mental health first aid, suicide intervention, and screening for substance misuse in primary care, mental health, and addiction treatment settings.

  • Best Practices for Sharing Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Information with County Jails

    Funder: Michigan Public Health Institute

    Principal Investigator: Sheryl Kubiak

    Sheryl Kubiak

    During this project, Dr. Kubiak is collaborating with Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS), county jails, and other stakeholders to 1. Review requirements for obtaining consent to share mental health and substance use disorder information; 2. Identify best practices for sharing mental health and substance use disorder information between jails and publicly funded mental health and substance use providers; 3. Identify barriers to sharing mental health and substance use disorder information between jails and publicly funded mental health and substance use providers; and 4. Identify actions to remove these barriers to align with national best practices while still protecting the confidentiality of individuals.

  • Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Program (COAP): Toxicology

    Funder: Indiana State Department of Health

    Principal Investigator: Bradley Ray

    Bradley Ray

    The objectives of this project include: rolling out the current funding of toxicology testing to all 92 counties in the state, expanding on the current efforts to test all suspected overdoses in emergency departments whether fatal or non-fatal, linking data between INSPECT, Coroner Case Management System, and the previously mentioned toxicology test results.

  • Culture Change in Advanced Illness: A Person Centered Healing and Wellness Intervention for Residents in Skilled Nursing Facilities

    Funder: Michigan Department of Health & Human Services

    Co-Principal Investigators: 

    This one-year pilot project, developed with input from the residents’ council at the Village of East Harbor, is focusing on enhancing satisfaction and quality of life for skilled nursing residents with advanced illness. The program involves 1. Education and training for nurses, certified nursing assistants (CNAs), the chaplain, and activities personnel; 2. A person-focused intervention offering options for Healing Touch, aromatherapy, and/or companionship and video or phone visits; and 3. Enhancement of pre-death and after-death protocols with staff member, resident, and family input.

  • Developing SUPPORT, a Community-Driven, Recovery-Oriented System of Care

    Funder: Indiana University

    Principal Investigator: Bradley Ray

    Bradley Ray

    Dr. Brad Ray is designing, implementing, and piloting randomized control trials (RCT) of a community-driven recovery-oriented system of care for returning inmates with substance use disorder called SUPPORT. As part of his effort on this project Dr. Ray is continuing to work with Dr. Dennis Watson, as well as Dr. Michelle Salyers at IUPUI, to assure that follow-up survey data are collected from research subjects and will oversee the statistical analysis of the RCT.

  • Electronic Dating Abuse: A Longitudinal Examination of Precursors and Sequelae (Resubmission 2018)

    Funder: National Institutes of Health (University of Michigan sub-award)

    Principal Investigators:
    Poco Kernsmith & Joanne Smith-Darden (Michigan State University)

    Poco Kernsmith and Joanne Smith-Darden

    This is a continuation of the ongoing, longitudinal study in which the Wayne State University research team is collaborating with the University of Michigan to explore the attitudes and experiences of youth, their parents, and school personnel with technologically facilitated behaviors such as stalking, emotional abuse and coercive sexting. The goal of the project is to explore the etiology of youth intimate partner violence and sexual behavior in the context of social media and mobile technology and to develop education and prevention programs on healthy online and dating behavior.

  • Enhancing Medication Assisted Therapies Availability and Continuity of Care between First Responders and Jail

    Funder: Community Foundation for Southeastern Michigan

    Principal Investigator: Sheryl Kubiak

    Sheryl Kubiak

    This project involves engagement between Wayne State University, Center for Behavioral Health and Justice (WSU-CBHJ) and Community Foundation of South East Michigan (CFSEM) for the “Jail Medication Assisted Therapies (MAT)” project. Through this engagement WSU-CBHJ is providing CFSEM with the following: Providing leadership, facilitation, guidance and technical assistance for communities to develop and strengthen local systems of care for substance use disorder treatment, resulting in: A “no wrong door approach” and a shorter path into treatment from first responder discovery point (dispatch, law enforcement, para-medics, EMTs); and o Improved delivery and integration of substance use treatment with specific focus on first responders, jails, and community re-entry post jail incarceration.

  • Evaluation of the Allen County Substance Abuse Pilot Program

    Funder: The Lutheran Foundation

    Principal Investigator: Bradley Ray

    Bradley Ray

    Dr. Brad Ray and researchers at Wayne State University, Center for Behavioral Health and Justice (WSU-CBHJ) will partner to evaluate the Allen County Substance Abuse Pilot Program which was created through Senate Enrolled Act 510-2017.

  • Evaluation of the Partnership for Success Grant

    Using the model of the Strategic Prevention Framework, 6 regional entities are engaged with 9 communities across Michigan to reduce underage drinking and prescription drug misuse in youth aged 12 – 20. The PFS process evaluation tracks progress toward meeting the project goals, objectives, and outcomes. Process measures include the percentage of recipient communities that have increased their number of evidence-based programs, policies, practices, and prevention activities. It also explores how evidence based practices like Strengthening Families and SBIRT have impacted substance use. The evaluation will develop guidance documents to help with replication of key processes.

  • External Facilitation and Implementation Planning

    Funder: Wayne County Circuit Court

    Principal Investigator: Sheryl Kubiak

    Sheryl Kubiak

    At the request of Wayne County and the Third Judicial Circuit Court, the Wayne State University, Center for Behavioral Health and Justice (WSU-CBHJ) is providing continued external facilitation of weekly meetings as the committee moves forward with the introduction of the risk assessment tool and the restructure of the Clinic for Child Study.

  • Global Student Success

    Funder: WSU University Research Grant Award

    Principle Investigator: Viktor Burlaka

    Viktor Burlaka

    Overall, this project aims to develop low-cost, highly effective and accessible programs that will help students live a successful and rewarding life during their time at college and beyond. Dr. Burlaka is working to accomplish this by 1. Defining the biopsychosocial characteristics that help resolve past and present negative experiences and set in motion knowledge acquisition skills and abilities that are beneficial to effective functioning; 2. Identify existing evidence-based practices that match these characteristics; and 3. Integrate and analyze data collected at WSU, the US South, and Ukraine, as well as data to be collected in China to understand sociocultural influences on multiple domains of student success.

     

  • Indiana Pretrial Risk Assessment Evaluation

    Funder: Indiana Office Court Services

    Principal Investigator: Bradley Ray

    Bradley Ray

    The Center for Behavioral Health and Justice (CBHJ) is providing county-by-county validations of the IRAS-PAT. To date, we have completed a validation of Monroe County that will be updated and then used as a framework for future validations. We aim to complete the validation of Allen County and then Hamilton County next and then continue working with counties to establish data collection procedures, clean and link records, conduct analysis, and write up a report. CBHJ is also furthering collaboration within each of these counties to identity other ways that local record linkage efforts might be used to address areas of interest. Within this scope of work they are purposing the following: Aim 1: Continue efforts to provide a county-level validation of the IRAS-PAT for select Indiana counties; Aim 2: Collect stakeholder information on research areas of interest with record linked data.

  • The Indianapolis Harm Reduction Team Study

    Funder: Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County

    Principal Investigator: Bradley Ray

    Bradley Ray

    Dr. Brad Ray and the Center for Behavioral Health and Justice (CBHJ) are conducting action research aimed at tracking program implementation, providing subject expertise and guidance, and ensuring expert evaluation of the Indianapolis Harm Reduction Team (IHART). This includes: Reviewing IHART data collection procedures with Project Coordinator and generating a brief report of descriptive statistics on program available data; Survey law enforcement officers about attitudes, barriers, and concerns regarding syringe services programs; Developing procedures to collaborate with local treatment and service providers to obtain data on “syringe services/harm reduction” as a referral source category. In January 2020, after the MCSSP was fully implemented, CBHJ researchers developed a survey instrumentation and consent form aimed at collecting data on client barriers and facilitators.

  • INSPECT Data Base Analysis

    Funder: Indiana State Department of Health

    Principal Investigator: Bradley Ray

    Bradley Ray

    Dr. Brad Ray is conducting a quantitative analysis of the INSPECT database to obtain the performance metrics: changes in the volume of opioid dispensation in Indiana; the number of patients receiving and providers prescribing chronic opioid therapy; the number of patients who doctor- or pharmacy-shop (acquiring medications from multiple sources), as well as the number of patients who receive and providers who prescribe both opioids and other controlled substances simultaneously. In addition, Dr. Brad Ray is conducting a quantitative examination of the relationship between medication assisted therapies (MAT) and fatal and nonfatal overdose using record linked MPH data. We will assess what proportion of individuals were dispensed an MAT (via INSPECT) following the non-fatal event (via EMS and ED data) and the time to dispensation of the MAT. We will report out descriptive statistics by county and over time on the proportion of non-fatal overdoses who dispensed an MAT as well as those who prescribed an opioid analgesic. Results will be delivered to ISDH as a policy brief.

  • Jail Diversion 2019-20

    Dr. Kubiak and the Center for Behavioral Health and Justice at WSU are implementing a two-phase evaluation of the interventions used in the five intercepts of the criminal/legal system: law enforcement, courts, jail detention, jail services, and re-entry into the community; and their impact. In 2019, phase 1 of the Jail Diversion project aims to work with the 2017 cohort to: 1. Report discharge activities and the continuum of care between jail and community-based treatment for individuals with a mental health issue; and 2. Determine if the identification and treatment of individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) within the jail affects recidivism rates. Phase 2 was initiated in 2019, assessing how individuals booked into the ten county jails are identified with SMI, referred for assessment, and access mental health, substance abuse services, and discharge services within the jail and upon return to the community. The team will also engage leaders in eight of the ten counties to discuss, consult, and strategic plan around the question: Do You Track Progress?

  • Marion County Prosecutors National Integrated Ballistic Information Network Program

    Funder: Marion County Prosecutor's NIBIN Program

    Principal Investigator: Bradley Ray

    Bradley Ray

    Technicians at the Indianapolis-Marion County Forensic Services Agency (Crime Lab) enter images of shell casing impressions from criminal events into the National Integrated Ballistic Information Network (NIBIN). The NIBIN database automates the comparison process, alerting law enforcement agencies to possible ballistic matches between multiple crime scenes. Law enforcement officers can then use these NIBIN leads to investigate crime guns and the offenders who wield them. In 2014, The Marion County Prosecutor’s Office (MCPO) launched the Strategic Prosecution Unit (SPU), an innovative program with the ultimate goal of reducing crime through timely information sharing. The SPU identifies and prioritizes those individuals who are the primary drivers of criminal activity and will expand to include the addition of a NIBIN prosecutor who will utilize NIBIN evidence to aggressively prosecute violent crime and the opioid trade while coordinating with law enforcement to bolster active investigations into unsolved gun crimes. The MCPO has received funding from the Department of Justice (DOJ) and is working with Dr. Brad Ray, Director of the Center for Behavioral Health and Justice (CBHJ) at Wayne State University, to conduct action research aimed at tracking program implementation and ensuring expert evaluation. This includes a process and outcome evaluation of program operations.

  • Mental Health Navigator Pilot Program

    Funder: Detroit Wayne Integrated Health Network

    Principal Investigator: Erin Comartin

    Erin Comartin

    DWMHA is proposing a two-year Mental Health Navigator Pilot Program that will utilize evidence based programs and best practice principles to provide post-booking diversion for persons with mental health disorders who have misdemeanor offenses. The program builds upon the best practices of the patient navigator model, utilizing a person-centered, time-sensitive approach to help individuals with SMI leave jail and obtain mental health treatment in the community. It also incorporates evidence-based practices (EBP) of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and Trauma-Informed Care.

  • Michigan Opioid State Targeted Response 2019-2020

    Funder: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

    Lead Principal Investigator:
    Elizabeth Agius

    Elizabeth Agius

    Co-Principal Investigator:
    Stella Resko

    Stella Resko

    This is an evaluation of a state-wide initiative to respond to the opioid crisis in the state of Michigan. The evaluation includes the collection and analysis of performance and outcome data.

  • Michigan Re-Entry Project 2019-2020

    Funder: Michigan Association of Community Mental Health Boards

    Principal Investigator: Sheryl Kubiak

    Sheryl Kubiak

    The overall project goals are to 1. Expand the availability of OUD treatment and recovery options for reentering persons; 2. Reduce opiate overdoses and other substance abuse relapses; 3. Improve mental health outcomes; and 4. Increase public safety by reducing criminal recidivism.

  • Michigan State Strategic Prevention Evaluation (SPE)

    Partnerships for Success 2015-2020 grant project strives to enhance behavioral health capacity within communities, by strengthening and expanding the Strategic Prevention Framework and enhancing community-level infrastructure to link with primary care. The grant project involves three central activities: (1) coalition development, continuation, and/or enhancement; (2) collaboration and capacity building in partnership with primary care providers to implement a screening process; and (3) development of individual and family-level intervention programs. These efforts aim to address underage drinking among youth ages 12-20 and prescription drug misuse and abuse among youth ages 12-25, in underserved Michigan communities. Undeserved targeted counties include: Muskegon, Mason, Oceana, St. Joseph, Bay, Wayne, Macomb, and Genesee; in Project Year 2018-2019, the grant project was expanded to Eaton and Van Buren counties.

  • Michigan Youth Treatment Infrastructure Enhancement Initiative Project 2019-2020

    Funder: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

    Principal Investigator: Elizabeth Agius

    Elizabeth Agius

    This is a program evaluation of a state-wide initiative to improve substance abuse treatment infrastructure in Michigan. The evaluation assesses progress on infrastructure improvements, efficacy of statewide training of stakeholders, and the benefits of these improvements.

  • Navigating Time and Space: Experiences of Aging and Hemophilia

    Funder: National Hemophilia Foundation

    Principal Investigator: Tam Perry

    Tam Perry

    This project is developing enhanced knowledge to previous work done in the area of the experiences and health needs of adults over the age of 40 living with hemophilia. An expanded domain of investigation for this population will use Bronfenbrenner’s ecological framework and Carstensen’s Socioemotional Selectivity Theory to focus on California’s unique healthcare landscape.

  • New England Regional Judicial Opioid Initiative

    Funder: National Center for State Courts

    Principal Investigator: Bradley Ray

    Bradley Ray

    In its first year, this project is focused on deploying a social network analysis (SNA) by sending an online survey to participating NE-RJOI members; doing a cross-state study of the Prescription Drug Abuse Policy System (PDAPS) data; and identifying county-level data elements for the purposes of creating an online visualization tool to conduct hotspot analysis to inform the implementation of EBPs. In the second year of this work CBHJ researchers will assess the impact of RJOI by replicating the SNA network study. CBHJ researchers will also replicate the SNA survey with the aim of determining whether the NE-RJOI has impacted collaborated practices within and across states.

  • Outcomes and Costs from a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Co-Response Police Model

    Funder: Arnold Ventures

    Principal Investigator: Bradley Ray

    Bradley Ray

    This project’s primary deliverable is a randomized controlled trial (RCT) examining multiple criminal justice and public health outcomes, including cost-benefits. The results will provide a critical and comprehensive test of the co-response model, an alternative approach to crisis intervention training for police and mental health professionals, and inform a subsequent multi-site study of the model across the state of Indiana.

  • Plan for Prevention and Intervention at Intercepts 0 and 1 in Detroit/Wayne County

    Funder: Ethel and James Flinn Family Foundation

    Principal Investigator: Sheryl Kubiak

    Sheryl Kubiak

    This project is one of a series of interventions designed to divert individuals with mental illness and substance use disorders from the criminal justice system. This initiative will provide cross-system training and data sharing to improve pre-booking alternatives to law enforcement and to improve linkages between clinical providers and jail/transition planning. The evaluation will document the process and assess outcomes.

  • Project POINT Evaluation

    Funder: Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County

    Principal Investigator: Bradley Ray

    Bradley Ray

    Researchers from the Center for Behavioral Health and Justice (CBHJ) at Wayne State University are partnering with Indianapolis Emergency Medicine Services and Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County to assist in the evaluation of Department of Justice (DOJ) funds for Project POINT, which is an emergency department intervention for nonfatal overdose cases. Dr. Brad Ray and the Project POINT evaluation team (led by Dr. Dennis Watson) are integrating data collection efforts between local law enforcement, public safety, and public health agencies to link various data metrics to Project POINT participants (e.g., jail booking data from the Marion County Jail, Emergency medical services from Indianapolis Emergency Medical Services, and vital records (mortality) data.

  • Rutgers Violence against Women Consortium

    Principal Investigator: Debra Patterson

    Debra Patterson

    The project aims to improve services for women who experience violence and to educate the greater community about best practices and policies, focusing on ways to identify, implement, and share research in areas where gaps in knowledge exist. Specifically, the project looks to develop a more nuanced understanding of the causes and consequences of sexual violence, intimate partner violence, teen dating violence, and stalking, with the ultimate goal of increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of the criminal justice system’s response to these crimes.

  • Regional Judicial Opioid Initiative

    Funder: Supreme Court of Ohio

    Principal Investigator: Bradley Ray

    Bradley Ray

    Dr. Brad Ray and researchers from the Center for Behavioral Health and Justice (CBHJ) at Wayne State University are partnering with the Supreme Court of Ohio and the National Center for State Courts (NCSC) to evaluate the Regional Judicial Opioid Initiative (RJOI), which is a cross-sector collaborative relationships across eight states: Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, and West Virginia. A key part of the evaluation is examining multiple sources of county-level data over time and across each of the states.

  • SMART Reentry Evaluation

    This project is a 3-year action research project that is evaluating the process and outcomes of an intervention to reduce recidivism rates of probationers re-entering into Wayne County. The target population includes probationers under the age of 24 who have at least one child or who have a supportive family member who is willing to participate in the intervention. The goal is to interrupt the intergenerational cycle of incarceration.

  • State of Michigan Youth Treatment Implementation Evaluation (MYTIE) Grant

    This is a program evaluation of a state-wide initiative to improve substance abuse treatment infrastructure in Michigan. The evaluation assesses progress on infrastructure improvements, efficacy of statewide training of stakeholders, and the benefits of these improvements.

  • State Opioid Response Supplemental Evaluation 2019-2020

    Funder: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

    Lead Principal Investigator:
    Elizabeth Agius

    Elizabeth Agius

    Co-Principal Investigator:
    Stella Resko

    Stella Resko

    This project provides supplemental services to the State of Michigan for the Statewide Opioid Response, an initiative designed to improve opioid addiction treatment in Michigan. Elizabeth Agius and Dr. Resko are supporting compliance with collecting and reporting all GPRA data and regular reporting to apprise implementation of the process and identify areas for improvement. Dr. Kubiak is working on bridging the transition from prison or jail to community re-entry for those with substance use disorder through Mission-CJ (Maintaining Independence and Sobriety through Systems Integration, Outreach and Networking-Criminal Justice Version).

  • Stepping Up Technical Assistance

    Through this program, the Center for Behavioral Health and Justice helping the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services provide technical assistance to 21 counties working to keep individuals with mental illness out of jail.

  • Strategic Prevention Framework Partnership for Success 2019-2020

    Funder: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

    Principal Investigator: Elizabeth Agius

    Elizabeth Agius

    This is a “process and outcome” evaluation of a State of Michigan project to improve substance abuse prevention. The evaluation includes tracking grant implementation progress (including use of coalitions in local communities), development of satisfaction surveys, and tracking outcomes as mandated by United States Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

  • Testing and Validating Financial Measures with Intimate Partner Violence Survivors

    Funder: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

    Principal Investigator: Kristina Nikolova

    Kristina Nikolova

    The overall goal of this study is to further analyze the measures used in a financial empowerment study and then validate these scales with a new sample of both English and Spanish-speaking IPV survivors. Dr. Nikolova is working to 1) test and revise financial scales which were pre-existing or adapted from scales used in the general population for use with IPV victims in both English and Spanish utilizing a secondary dataset, and 2) further test and validate measures that were analyzed as part of Objective One with a similar sample of IPV survivors in both English and Spanish to determine if these scales are appropriate for use with other IPV populations. Adapting and validating measures to study financial issues among survivors of IPV is a first step in striving to better understand how survivors' experiences are influenced by financial burdens, as well as how to measure positive increases in financial self-efficacy.

  • Transition to Independence Program (TIP)

    Funder: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

    Principal Investigator: Judith Wineman

    Judith Wineman

    The Champions Aspiring to Make Pathways to Success (CHAMPS; previously known as Transition to Independence Program) is an evidence-informed, college access and retention program for youth ages 18 - 26 who have "aged out" of the child welfare system and/or juvenile justice system and are enrolled students at Wayne State University. The CHAMPS Program in the Wayne State University School of Social Work exists to increase college access and improve the graduation rates of youth with foster care and juvenile justice history in Southeast Michigan.

  • The Urban Learning & Leadership Collaborative: A Place-Based Community Research Alliance to Promote Educational and Neighborhood Thriving in Detroit

    Funder: University of Michigan

    Principal Investigator: Richard Smith

    Richard

    The Urban Learning and Leadership Collaborative (ULLC) is a research-practice partnership that meshes local knowledge and university resources to create innovative, inquiry-based solutions to challenges identified by neighborhood residents in Detroit. The Collaborative model honors the unique and equally important contributions and expertise that academics, practitioners, and community member partners bring, while also growing the group’s collective social and intellectual capital for community good.

  • Water and Health Infrastructure Resilience and Learning (WHIRL)

    Funder: National Science Foundation

    Principal Investigator:
    Joanne Sobeck

    Joanne Sobeck

    Co-Investigator:
    Richard Smith

     Richard Smith

    This project seeks to develop theoretical frameworks for how water and health systems adapt to and learn from risks associated with water system-based disruptions to enhance resiliency. This is being accomplished through the completion of three objectives: 1. Identify the range of risks and disruptions in water and public health systems in urban areas and assess the extent to which the systems possess characteristics of resilience; 2. Evaluate how the public engages with drinking water and public health systems; and 3. Model how drinking water and public health systems respond to water system disruptions. Case studies are being conducted on recent disruptions in cities and tribal communities, which will be used to build on existing resilience frameworks with a coupled model of these two interdependent systems of how these systems jointly function and adapt to risks and hazards. 

  • Water and Health Infrastructure Resilience and Learning (WHIRL): National Infrastructure Scan

    Funder: Faculty Competition for Postdoctoral Fellows - Wayne State University Office of the Vice President for Research

    Principal Investigator: Richard Smith

    Richard Smith

    Drinking water and public health depend on each other. In many places it is difficult to avoid and fix big problems related to water safety when they happen. This project will assess threats to water safety and what happens when people’s access to clean water is disrupted. To do this, they aim to better understand how drinking water and public health are connected, with the belief that understanding these connections can improve water safety. The team believes that by using information from the public, they will be able to identify problems faster and show how drinking water and public health need to work together. This project will provide important information to help understand how to improve access to safe water. The team is made up of scientists, researchers, and students who study engineering, communication, and public health. They come from Wayne State University, the University of Michigan, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. They are working with the Water Research Foundation (WRF), National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA), City of Flint, Genesee County Health Department, City of Toledo, Wayne County Health Department, In-Situ Inc., and American Indian Mothers, Inc. (AIMI).

  • Wayne State University Opioid Inter-Professional Clinic Collaborative (WOICC) Program

    Funder: Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA)

    Principal Investigator: Umeika Stephens

    Umeika Stephens

    Key Person: Anwar Najor-Durack

    Anwar Najor-Durack

    Key Person: Cynthera McNeill

    Cynthera McNeill

    This project aims to develop and increase number of behavioral health professionals trained to address the current national opioid and substance use crisis by the advancement of clinical practice for nursing, social work, psychology, and psychiatry students through the provision of culturally competent, enhanced inter-professional education and core competencies, with emphasis on children, adolescents, transitional aged-youth, adults, and their families, at risk for developing or who have developed a recognized opioid or substance abuse disorder in high service need areas.

  • Wayne State University: Suicide Prevention Initiative Evaluation

    Funder: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    Principal Investigator: Jeffrey Kuentzel (Counseling & Psychological Services Director)
    Associate Director: Karen Huyghe (Campus Health Center, Marketing & Outreach Manager)
    Co-Investigator: Ramona Benkert (College of Nursing)
    Project Coordinator: Stephanie Kastely (Counseling & Psychological Services)
    Mental Health First Aid Educators: Shantalea Johns, Stephanie Katstely (Counseling & Psychological Services)

    Evaluators: 

    Wayne State University has been awarded a three-year, Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention Grant worth $305,354. The grant is being used for WSU’s campus-wide Suicide Prevention Initiative that seeks to develop an infrastructure of education, training and dissemination of suicide prevention information to faculty, staff, students, and their families.  A number of WSU offices and departments are collaborating on this project, including Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS), the Campus Health Center, the College of Nursing, the Psychology Clinic, the Dean of Students Office, and the School of Social Work. Various initiatives are engaging student, faculty & staff stakeholders across the entire campus. Neva Nahan and Kendra Wells of the School of Social Work are serving as evaluators on the project.

    For more information about the project: https://suicideprevention.wayne.edu/

  • Work-Addiction Eco System Project

    Funder: Michigan Health Endowment Fund

    Principal Investigator: Sheryl Kubiak

    Sheryl Kubiak

    Through this project, the Center for Behavioral Health and Justice (CBHJ) and Dr. Kubiak are providing leadership facilitation for communities to develop and strengthen local systems of care (ecosystems of care) for substance use disorder treatment, resulting in: a “no wrong door approach” and a shorter path into treatment from first responder discovery point (dispatch, law enforcement, para-medics, EMTs); and improved delivery and integration of substance use treatment with specific focus on first responders, jails, and community re-entry post jail incarceration.

  • Youth Empowerment Solutions for Healthy Relationships: Engaging Youth to Prevent Sexual Violence

    Principal Investigators:
    Poco Kernsmith & Joanne Smith-Darden (Michigan State University)

    Poco Kernsmith and Joanne Smith-Darden

    The project is adapting, implementing, and evaluating an evidence-based program to prevent sexual and dating violence perpetration among youth. The school-based prevention program is being infused in the curriculum, with the goal of empowering youth to identify problems in their own communities and build skills to develop student-led prevention initiatives. Six schools in the region are collaborating on the project, as well as partners from the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Department of Psychology, and Michigan Department of Community Health Rape Prevention and Education Program.