Current research

  • Advanced Nursing Education Evaluation

    Principal Investigator: Linda George

    The project aims to enhance clinical education through innovative academic-practice partnerships, using a statewide collaboration between schools of nursing, federally qualified health centers, community health centers and an area health education center. Dr. Kim Jaffee of the School of Social Work will conduct the evaluation of the program.

  • A Mixed Methods Evaluation of a Culturally Specifically Latina Victim Service Program: The LAVIDA Partnership

    Funder: Office on Violence Against Women

    Principal Investigator:
    Debra Patterson

    Debra Patterson

    Co-Investigator:
    Stella Resko

    Stella Resko

     

    The project seeks to understand: a) what distinguishes culturally specific services from mainstream services and the intended outcomes for enhancing Latina survivors’ wellbeing b) Latina survivors’ self-defined goals and needs, and c) the extent to which the culturally specific services meet those needs and help survivors achieve their goals. This project is being accomplished through a community-participatory exploratory sequential mixed methods evaluation of a culturally specific Latina victim service program.

     

  • An Investigation on Predictors of Occupational Functioning in Individuals with Bipolar Disorder

    Funder:
    WSU University Research Grant Award

    Principal Investigator:
    Lisa O'Donnell

    Judith Wineman

    This project seeks to identify biopsychosocial predictors of poor employment outcomes (work functioning and status) among individuals with bipolar disorder. Dr. O’Donnell is currently examining data from her dissertation study to determine the effects of clinical, neurocognitive, interpersonal and environmental features on how individuals with bipolar I disorder or bipolar II disorder function at work and whether they maintain employment. This research aims to inform novel approaches to remediating poor occupational functioning ultimately improving the overall functioning of individuals with bipolar disorder.

  • Behavioral Health Workforce Interdisciplinary Education and Training Grant

    Funder: Health Resources and Services Administration

    Co-Principal Investigator:
    Suzanne Brown

    Sue Brown

    Co-Principal Investigator:
    Umeika Stephens(College of Nursing)

    Umeika Stephens

    With this grant from the U.S. Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA), Dr. Brown and Dr. Stephens are working to educate and train graduate social work and nursing students, their nursing preceptors, social work field education supervisors and faculty advisors, and community partners in integrated mental health care delivery. Areas of focus include mental health first aid, suicide intervention, and screening for substance misuse in primary care, mental health, and addiction treatment settings.

  • Evaluation of the Partnership for Success Grant

    Using the model of the Strategic Prevention Framework, 6 regional entities are engaged with 9 communities across Michigan to reduce underage drinking and prescription drug misuse in youth aged 12 – 20. The PFS process evaluation tracks progress toward meeting the project goals, objectives, and outcomes. Process measures include the percentage of recipient communities that have increased their number of evidence-based programs, policies, practices, and prevention activities. It also explores how evidence based practices like Strengthening Families and SBIRT have impacted substance use. The evaluation will develop guidance documents to help with replication of key processes.

  • Getting More Specific: Engaging Stakeholders to Move from Competencies to Learning Outcomes

    Funder: Wayne State University Program Assessment Grant

    Prinicipal Investigator: Shirley Thomas

    Co-Investigators: Neva Nahan, Joy Ernst

    Shirley Thomas, Neva Nahan, Joy Ernst

    This project is implementing a stakeholder-engagement process to determine how students, faculty, and practitioners understand the social work competencies taught at the undergraduate and master’s levels and how this is represented by learning outcomes.

  • Global Student Success

    Funder: WSU University Research Grant Award

    Principle Investigator:
    Viktor Burlaka

    Viktor Burlaka

    Overall, this project aims to develop low-cost, highly effective and accessible programs that will help students live a successful and rewarding life during their time at college and beyond. Dr. Burlaka is working to accomplish this by 1. Defining the biopsychosocial characteristics that help resolve past and present negative experiences and set in motion knowledge acquisition skills and abilities that are beneficial to effective functioning; 2. Identify existing evidence-based practices that match these characteristics; and 3. Integrate and analyze data collected at WSU, the US South, and Ukraine, as well as data to be collected in China to understand sociocultural influences on multiple domains of student success.

     

  • Jail Diversion 2018-19

    Principal Investigator:
    Sheryl Kubiak

    Dr. Kubiak and the Center for Behavioral Health and Justice at WSU are implementing a two-phase evaluation of the interventions used in the five intercepts of the criminal/legal system: law enforcement, courts, jail detention, jail services, and re-entry into the community; and their impact. In 2019, phase 1 of the Jail Diversion project aims to work with the 2017 cohort to: 1. Report discharge activities and the continuum of care between jail and community-based treatment for individuals with a mental health issue; and 2. Determine if the identification and treatment of individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) within the jail affects recidivism rates. Phase 2 will be initiated in 2019, assessing how individuals booked into the ten county jails are identified with SMI, referred for assessment, and access mental health, substance abuse services, and discharge services within the jail and upon return to the community. The team will also engage leaders in eight of the ten counties to discuss, consult, and strategic plan around the question: Do You Track Progress?

  • Michigan Mental Health and Justice Award

    Principal Investigator:
    Sheryl Kubiak

    Sheryl Kubiak

    Funder: National Institutes of Mental Health (Michigan State University subaward)

    National Institute of Mental Health

    This project is facilitating communication between community mental health (CMH) and jail/court systems to increase identification of CMH clients in the justice system and provide opportunities for diversion and better continuity of care. This is done through the implementation of the Interceptor Reporting System (IRS) intervention, which is a CMH-side program that matches continual downloads from court dockets and jail booking logs to the county CMH client database, notifying community clinicians when matched CMH clients are detained or have a pending court dates. Anticipated target mechanisms of the IRS intervention are both (1) clinician knowledge of client’s justice encounter, and (2) clinician action on this information to improve continuity of care and increase the number of diversions (primary).

  • Michigan State Strategic Prevention Evaluation (SPE)

    Principal Investigator:
    Elizabeth Agius

    Partnerships for Success 2015-2020 grant project strives to enhance behavioral health capacity within communities, by strengthening and expanding the Strategic Prevention Framework and enhancing community-level infrastructure to link with primary care. The grant project involves three central activities: (1) coalition development, continuation, and/or enhancement; (2) collaboration and capacity building in partnership with primary care providers to implement a screening process; and (3) development of individual and family-level intervention programs. These efforts aim to address underage drinking among youth ages 12-20 and prescription drug misuse and abuse among youth ages 12-25, in underserved Michigan communities. Undeserved targeted counties include: Muskegon, Mason, Oceana, St. Joseph, Bay, Wayne, Macomb, and Genesee; in Project Year 2018-2019, the grant project was expanded to Eaton and Van Buren counties.

  • Rutgers Violence against Women Consortium

    Principal Investigator: Debra Patterson

    Debra Patterson

    The project aims to improve services for women who experience violence and to educate the greater community about best practices and policies, focusing on ways to identify, implement, and share research in areas where gaps in knowledge exist. Specifically, the project looks to develop a more nuanced understanding of the causes and consequences of sexual violence, intimate partner violence, teen dating violence, and stalking, with the ultimate goal of increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of the criminal justice system’s response to these crimes.

  • SMART Reentry Evaluation

    Principal Investigator: Erin Comartin

    This project is a 3-year action research project that is evaluating the process and outcomes of an intervention to reduce recidivism rates of probationers re-entering into Wayne County. The target population includes probationers under the age of 24 who have at least one child or who have a supportive family member who is willing to participate in the intervention. The goal is to interrupt the intergenerational cycle of incarceration.

  • Starfish Trauma Smart Evaluation

    Funder: Starfish Family Services

    Principal Investigator: Carolyn Dayton

    Carolyn Dayton

    Co-Principal Investigator: Ann Stacks

    Ann Stacks

    This evaluation is designed to assess provider response, including satisfaction and changes in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of the implementation of the Trauma Smart Program within early childhood programs at Starfish Family Services. The program is being implemented to improve trauma informed care (TIC) throughout the agency.

  • State of Michigan Youth Treatment Implementation Evaluation (MYTIE) Grant
  • Stepping Up Technical Assistance

    Principal Investigator:
    Sheryl Kubiak

    Through this program, the Center for Behavioral Health and Justice helping the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services provide technical assistance to 21 counties working to keep individuals with mental illness out of jail.

  • Supporting Emergency Needs for Foster Youth

    Principal Investigator:
    Judith Wineman

    This program supports students with history of foster care in meeting basic needs that can promote their academic success. After a thorough review of student needs, food insecurity, lack of money for books and supplies, transportation and housing/utilities are priorities for support. Champions Aspiring to Make Pathways to Success (CHAMPS) offers direct, essential supports to one of the most historically marginalized youth populations in the nation, to help students achieve success, independence and self-sufficiency.

  • Training Nursing And Social Work Students To Become SBIRT Service Providers In Michigan

    Funder: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

    Principal Investigators:
    Feleta Wilson, Umeika Stephens, Cynthera McNeil (College of Nursing)

    Feleta Wilson

    Collaborating Partner:
    Anwar Najor-Durack

    Anwar Najor-Durack

    Wayne State is the first university in the State of Michigan to receive a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) grant for training students in Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT), which is an integrated public health approach to delivering early intervention and treatment services for persons with, or at risk of developing substance use disorders. SBIRT is designed for use in primary care centers, hospital emergency rooms, trauma centers, and other community settings that are a person’s first, and sometimes only contact with the health care system.

  • Water and Health Infrastructure Resilience and Learning (WHIRL)

    Funder: National Science Foundation

    Principal Investigator:
    Joanne Sobeck

    Joanne Sobeck

    Co-Investigator:
    Richard Smith

     Richard Smith

    This project seeks to develop theoretical frameworks for how water and health systems adapt to and learn from risks associated with water system-based disruptions to enhance resiliency. This is being accomplished through the completion of three objectives: 1. Identify the range of risks and disruptions in water and public health systems in urban areas and assess the extent to which the systems possess characteristics of resilience; 2. Evaluate how the public engages with drinking water and public health systems; and 3. Model how drinking water and public health systems respond to water system disruptions. Case studies are being conducted on recent disruptions in cities and tribal communities, which will be used to build on existing resilience frameworks with a coupled model of these two interdependent systems of how these systems jointly function and adapt to risks and hazards. 

  • Wayne State University: Suicide Prevention Initiative Evaluation

    Funder: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    Principal Investigator: Jeffrey Kuentzel (CAPS Director)
    Associate Director: Ann Rayford (Chief Nursing officer for the Campus Health Center)
    Co-Investigator: Ramona Benkert (College of Nursing)
    Project Coordinator: Stephanie Kastely (CAPS)
    Mental Health Frist Aid Educators: Shantalea Johns, Stephanie Katstely (CAPS)

    Evaluators:

    Wayne State University has been awarded a three-year, Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention Grant worth $305,354. The grant is being used for WSU’s campus-wide Suicide Prevention Initiative that seeks to develop an infrastructure of education, training and dissemination of suicide prevention information to faculty, staff, students, and their families.  A number of WSU offices and departments are collaborating on this project, including Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS), the Campus Health Center, the College of Nursing, the Psychology Clinic, the Dean of Students Office, and the School of Social Work. Various initiatives are engaging student, faculty & staff stakeholders across the entire campus. Caitlin Brown and Neva Nahan of the School of Social Work are serving as evaluators on the project.

  • Wayne Together Child Welfare Learning And Leadership Collaborative

    Funder: National Child Welfare Workforce Institute

    Additional Information:
    Wayne Together Child Welfare & Leadership Collaborative flyer

    Principal Investigators:

    The National Welfare Workforce Institute selected WSU School of Social Work as one of 13 sites to receive a University Partnership Grant. Wayne Together Collaborative partners with Wayne County MDHHS with four main objectives: increase and sustain the number of competent MSW graduates pursuing child welfare specialization in metro Detroit, provide group-mentoring focusing on individual development plans, and increase DHS workforce retention rates. WSU students who participate in this program have the opportunity to pursue a field placement that provides specialized training in child welfare, receive a $10,000 stipend, network, and integrate fieldwork with coursework. For more information please visit https://forms.wayne.edu/56a117ecdd3c7.

  • Youth Empowerment Solutions for Healthy Relationships: Engaging Youth to Prevent Sexual Violence

    The project is adapting, implementing, and evaluating an evidence-based program to prevent sexual and dating violence perpetration among youth. The school-based prevention program is being infused in the curriculum, with the goal of empowering youth to identify problems in their own communities and build skills to develop student-led prevention initiatives. Six schools in the region are collaborating on the project, as well as partners from the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Department of Psychology, and Michigan Department of Community Health Rape Prevention and Education Program.